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Seeing parasites in our pets’ poop grosses just about everyone out. The dangerous parasites are actually the ones you don’t see. Generally, when pet owners see diarrhea or worms they call their vet—which they should—but not all pets with parasites have obvious signs. The stool of a pet with only a few worms may look normal but contain dozens of eggs, and the eggs of the roundworm can survive in soil for 6-10 years. Not only does that make a backyard a source of parasite infection for animals, it means that children who play there and adults who garden there can be exposed. In humans these parasites can cause more serious problems, including gastrointestinal illness and even blindness.

There are several types of worms that may affect our pets and the most common in our region are roundworms, hookworms, and whipworms. Roundworm can spread to people and in some cases migrate into the nervous system and eyes causing blindness. Hookworm can cause skin rashes as the young parasite migrates under human skin. Many people mistakenly think that because they don’t see any diarrhea, their pet doesn’t have parasites but this may not be true. When only a few worms are present their pet may have normal stool but pass several hundred eggs. When a dog is kept in the same yard, the eggs may begin to accumulate, constantly re-exposing the dog and any other animals in the yard. Since the eggs of roundworm cam survive a very long time—even though winter’s ice and snow, a yard that is heavily infested is a risk to humans especially when they eat with unwashed hands after cleaning up after pets. Many pet stores carry “de-worming medications” but these products rarely target all of the varieties of worms. Veterinarians can check a stool sample for the presence of parasite eggs and know exactly which parasites your pet is carrying and what medication will be safest and most effective. Your Veterinary doctor can also set up a preventative program with you to keep everyone safe.

HERE is the good news. Parasite problems can be easily controlled in our pets and good parasite control plus good hygiene can protect your family. Talk to your Veterinarian to set up an appropriate de-worming schedule.

Winter Grooming

  • If you normally have your pet’s fur clipped or shaved, keep the length longer in winter to keep your dog warm.
  • Nails may require more frequent trimming since your pet is spending more time indoor on soft surfaces.  This applies for cats too.
  • If you bathe your dog at home make sure he is completely dry before going out.
  • Examine the pads of your pet’s feet for signs of cracking or irritation. If you find your pet has cracking call your veterinarian before applying anything to check which products are safe.

Thank you for disposing of your prescription medications appropriately! Due to legal changes, we can no longer accept donated medications that have been dispensed for patients. We very much appreciate your intentions. To safely dispose of your pet’s unused medications, you may choose one of the following methods:

1. The State Trooper Barracks in Batavia, NY (down the street from our hospital) has a box for medication disposal. All medications are accepted.

2. National & Local Prescription Drug Take Back Events occur regularly at various local locations. These are advertised in local newspapers and on radio stations periodically.

3. You may dispose of certain medications yourself. These medications may be mixed in a closed plastic bag with an absorbent, unpalatable material such as kitty litter, used coffee grounds, or soil. This mixture (in the closed bag) can be mixed with a little water and then be disposed of in household trash.

a. The following medications SHOULD NOT be disposed of using this method and must be brought to the Trooper Barracks:

  1. Phenobarbitol
  2. Alprazolam (Xanax)
  3. Tramadol
  4. Hydrocodone
  5. Proin

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8 Things You Can Do to Protect Your Dog This Summer

  1. Never leave your dog in the car;
  2. Make sure your dog has unlimited access to fresh water;
  3. Make sure your dog has access to shade when outside;
  4. Take walks during the cooler hours of the day;
  5. When walking, try to stay off of hot surfaces (like asphalt) because it can burn your dog’s paws;
  6. If you think it’s hot outside, it’s even hotter for your pet – make sure your pet has a means of cooling off
  7. Keep your dog free of external parasites (fleas, ticks) and heartworms – consult your veterinarian about the best product for your pet;
  8. Consider clipping or shaving dogs with long coats, and applying sunscreen to exposed skin. Consult your veterinarian to see if these measures would be appropriate for your dog
  9. If you have any questions or concerns, please don’t hesitate to call us!! We’re here to help both you and your pet.

Keep Your Pet Safe Year Round!

Mosquitos, fleas and ticks all carry diseases that can seriously harm your dogs and cats. Protecting your pet from these parasites is critical. Check out our summer buy more, save more offer today by calling (585) 344-4974.

imgres-1Fireworks, picnics, and other Fourth of July traditions can be great fun for people but these festivities can be frightening and even dangerous for animals. Noisy fireworks and sparklers can startle animals and cause them to bolt and run away; more animals are lost on July 4th than any other day of the year. Barbecues are wonderful to share with people but be cautious about sharing with your pets. Corn cobs and steak bones can get stuck half way through the digestive tract, causing a foreign body obstruction, which requires surgery to remove the stuck item. Summer heat can cause heat stroke in our pets quickly after sitting in a hot car or lots of activity on a hot day.

Whether or not you’re planning your own Independence Day celebration, it’s important to take precautions to keep your pets safe both during and after the July 4th festivities.

Make sure your pets – cats and dogs alike – have identification with up to date information. If your pets aren’t already micro chipped, talk with your veterinarian about microchipping. This simple procedure can greatly improve your chances of recovering your pets if they become lost. We are running a microchip special until July 3rd and discounting microchipping $10.00.

Remember that too much sun and heat (and humidity!) can be dangerous to pets. Keep them inside when it’s extremely hot/humid or make sure they have access to shady spots and plenty of water when outdoors. Signs of overheated pets include increased panting, lethargy, and vomiting. NEVER leave your pet in the car when it’s warm outside. Vehicle interiors heat up much faster than the air around them, and even a short time in a locked car can be dangerous to pets.

We at State Street Animal Hospital hope you have a great Independence Day with your friends, family, and pets!!

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